Brinell hardness testing

The Brinell Hardness Testing

Brinell hardness testing occurs in more robust materials with a very course and inhomogeneous grain structure. It tests the resistance of an object to an induced indentation. Commonly, it applies in structures with too rough substances or also course surfaces that can’t get tested using other methods. The Brinell Hardness Testing requires applying a predetermined load or force raging between 187.5 to 3000kgf, to a carbide ball of a constant 2.5 or 10mm diameter for a specified period. After the predetermined time, you remove the load and measure the resulting impression across the indent at right angles using an optical system or Brinell microscope. You then use the average value to calculate hardness, and most often, you can use charts that help to convert the averaged diameter into Brinell hardness values.

Brinell hardness testing

Applications of the test

Brinell testing commonly occurs in material testing to measure the characteristics and behaviors of various substances like metals in copper, aluminum, iron, and steel companies. It also measures the strength in ceramics and plastics in varying conditions. The obtained data then helps to determine the suitability of various items in specific applications, including construction or machinery. The measurement will also help to determine the durability of a structure before installation. Using the Brinell hardness test, you can determine the maximum weight load a material can handle without fracturing. It’s a highly indicative method of the hardness in bulk materials compared to other methods, and at times it helps to determine the impurities inclusion levels.

Brinell hardness testing